Archive for the ‘Environment’ Category

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Book Review: Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me

December 11, 2008

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Update – 12/17/08: Kekoa Enomoto wrote a very cogent review of Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me for the Maui News. Additionally, the Hawaiian language newscast ‘Aha‘i ‘Ōlelo Ola (CBS affiliate KGMB-TV) covered the launch of this debut novel.

In the voice of darkness, birds stirred with anticipation. The approaching daylight separated sky from earth. By the time the first rays of the sun reached the top of the Ko‘olau Mountains, the birds were already in full chorus, celebrating the arrival of a new day.

On the leeward coast of O‘ahu, a Hawaiian woman, ageless as the ocean, stood in the mystery, ready to carry out her role in the morning ceremony. Water lapped as the tide rose. Into the darkness, facing the intense calm of the water, she began to chant. The primal sound of her voice was filled with the power of those who came before her. Her song carried out to sea.

So begins award-winning filmmaker Lurline McGregor’s first novel, Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me.

Turning her cinematic eye to a story that inherently resonates with so many of us, McGregor delves into what makes a native person native. Expanding upon the question of nature versus nurture, she tells the tale of a woman – Native Hawaiian by birth, western by upbringing – who is forced to confront the dichotomy of her indigenous past with the realities of the 21st century.

book-coverWithin this riveting story we follow the protagonist Moana Kawelo on her quest to reconnect with her kū‘auhau (heritage) and understand what it means to be a Native Hawaiian in the modern world.

The exploration of cultural consciousness in Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me has received enthusiastic reviews from around the native world. The Chairman of the Board of the national Native Arts and Culture Foundation, Walter Echo-Hawk, raved, “Wow! What a moving story about the spiritual side of Native life in modern-day Hawai’i.”

potiki“It is an intriguing story of modern Hawai‘i, its legacies and therefore its concerns,” shared Patricia Grace, Māori author and winner of the prestigious Neustadt International Prize for Literature. “It is a story contextualized by the connectedness between generations, land, culture and spiritual guardianship – all drawn together in a ‘now’ time.”

Author Lurline McGregor continued, “Just as the movie Whale Rider was able to present an authentic Māori experience while speaking to a broader global audience, our Hawaiian stories can also be used to inspire people worldwide.”

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Daviana McGregor at the launch of Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me

At the book’s launch party, Muscogee poet and author Joy Harjo eloquently reflected on the power of the native voice presented in Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me. “We are all indigenous peoples, we can all trace our lineages to a time when our ancestors listened to the earth.” Native Hawaiian activist and author Davianna McGregor (and Lurline’s cousin) continued, “Lurline gives us a story that articulates the past and the present – land, repatriation, and spirit are forged together to create an engrossing tale of modern and ancient Hawai‘i.”

Lurline McGregor autographs copies of her new book, Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me

Lurline McGregor signs copies of her new book


Between the Deep Blue Sea and Me is published by Kamehameha Publishing. For more information, click here.

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Buy a Local Christmas Tree and Help A Great Organization at the Same Time

November 26, 2008

Are you thinking of buying a real Christmas tree this year? You can get the freshest possible tree, grown right here on O‘ahu – all while reducing your carbon footprint AND supporting a really worthwhile organization, Mālama Hawai‘i.

Partnering with Helemano Farms – located in Wahiawā – Mālama Hawai‘i is selling locally grown Christmas trees. Helemano Farms, the only local Chirstmas tree farmers on O‘ahu, grow beautiful Norfolk pine trees, also known as the “Hawaiian Christmas Tree.” This species was originally brought to Hawai‘i about 80 years ago as part of massive reforestation efforts to restore watersheds.

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Rather than buying one of the over 100,000 trees shipped more than 2,500 miles that can be carriers of dangerous invasive species, consider Helemano Farms. Bring your friends and family and choose your own fresh tree from a farm of more than 10,000 trees. Helemano Farms cuts its Norfolk trees in such a way that each stump eventually will grow into a new tree.

The cost is $40 for a 6 foot tree. Norfolks stay green, healthy and gorgeous for over a month.

You can order a tree through Mālama Hawai‘i. To receive instructions on how to get your tree, email them at info@malamahawaii.org. By purchasing your locally grown tree through this offer, you are helping to keep Hawai‘i beautiful in more ways than one – reducing your carbon footprint and supporting an organization dedicated to the people and environment of Hawai‘i. For a quick link to Mālama Hawaii’s contact info, please click here.

For more information on Helemano Farms, please click here.

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‘Tis the Season to Be Green

November 17, 2008

Now that the holidays are officially bearing down, here are a few tips on how we can enjoy a more sustainable season courtesy of Kōkua Hawai‘i and Kanu Hawai‘i. Check out their websites for more tips and to make a simple declaration of your intent to green your holidays.

– When buying a Christmas tree, consider a live potted one. If you do get a cut tree, find one that’s locally grown. Don’t forget to recycle with your green waste after the holidays.
– Give teachers, coworkers, and friends edible gifts, plants, or gift certificates instead of “stuff” that will get stuck in a drawer somewhere.
– Start eco-friendly traditions. For example, when you go out caroling in your neighborhood, take an empty trash bag and pick up any litter you see along the way.
– Reuse wrapping paper and bows or try repurposing newspapers, brown paper bags, maps, or art work to make your own unique, eco-friendly packages. Reusable grocery bags are also a good gift-wrapping option, and then it’s a gift inside a gift. (If you don’t have reusable grocery bags, here’s a great place to get them and the proceeds go to charity).

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– Give reusable or homemade gifts. Shop for gently used gifts at thrift shops or on-line at www.Craigslist.org or www.Freecycle.org. Give gifts of time like certificates for a massage or a car wash. Treat a loved one to ‘ukulele lessons or tickets to a sporting or cultural event.
– When shopping for holiday food and gifts, try to plan ahead and consolidate trips in order to save fuel and reduce pollution. Also, don’t forget to take along your reusable cloth grocery bags to use instead of the disposable ones!
– During the holiday season the most rewarding gift of all is giving back to your community. Make it a family tradition to donate to or volunteer for charitable causes during the holidays.

Here are few more sites that may give you some green ideas this season.
Green Holiday Tips from the Sierra Club
Green Guide from National Geographic
Earth Easy’s Green Christmas
The Guardian’s A-Z Tips for a Green Christmas
Oliver Heath’s Tips for a Green Christmas
Newsweek’s How to Have a Green Christmas
Green Expander’s 10 Tips for a Green Christmas

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Kids Lead the Way to a Greener Hawai‘i

November 17, 2008

We’ve all heard it before. Out of the mouth of babes. Yet, never before had this struck me as so true as when I visited a small dual-language school in urban Honolulu, HI.

Piko

Each day the keiki (children) of Kawaiaha‘o School, aged 18-months to 10-years-old, gather to begin their day with what they call their piko (literally umbilical cord or that which ties them back to their foundation). This daily assembly is a time to gather, greet each other and start the day in the spirit of aloha (love) and lōkahi (unity).

An important part of their piko is a pledge. Not just to one people or one place, but to the entire Earth.

“I pledge allegiance to the earth and to all life that it nourishes – all growing things, all species of animals, and all races of people. I promise to protect all life on our planet, to live in harmony with nature and to share our resources justly – so that all people can live with dignity, in good health and in peace.”

Knowing that reciting and understanding are not necessarily the same thing, their kumu (teachers) work daily with the keiki to deeply instill Aloha ‘Āina – love for the land.

Several years ago, the keiki themselves began re-landscaping their urban campus, planting mainly native plants that encourage the return of native wildlife. Their efforts were recognized when the nation’s largest member-supported conservation group, the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), named them the first school in Hawai‘i to achieve certification as a NWF Schoolyard Habitat.

NWF story

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Click to see full article

Following upon the success of their native garden, the keiki instituted a full school recycling and composting program. The children began collecting and recycling paper, glass, aluminum, plastic and used ink cartridges. Today, their collections go far beyond the school campus. Families, friends and neighboring businesses are all encouraged to work with the keiki to ensure recyclables do not go to the landfill. The children also enlisted teachers and parents to help build composting bins so that biodegradable refuse could be used in their native garden. Their goal is to create a zero-waste school.

Moanalua Garden Award

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These and other efforts brought them to the attention of one of Hawaii’s best known education non-profits, The Moanalua Gardens Foundation. In 2008, the Foundation awarded the school with their 2007 Hawai‘i Needs Care Award.

However, even with such praise, the keiki felt their efforts needed to expand beyond their immediate sphere. “We do a lot for ourselves, but we need to help other people, too,” shared second-grader Kealoha Garvin.

Taking this to heart, the children found that even small actions can help in big ways. After learning about suffering children in the Azawak in Niger – the world’s most drought ridden area – the Kawaiaha‘o keiki chose to create a program called Ka Wai Ola – the water of life. As a part of this project, the keiki sell green products with 100% of the proceeds going to dig deepwater wells in Africa. Their first item, a reusable grocery bag, sold out in less than a month. Their second item, a larger reusable bag, will be available in a few days.

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Click to see full story

The keiki also created an earth-friendly cleanser and bug spray. Using only natural, non-toxic materials, the children researched how to create products that are both green and effective. They also researched how to market their products – from branding and packaging to sales, they are using their gained knowledge to better our community.

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Another effort the keiki have undertaken is to help other children become environmental leaders. They wrote and produced a public service announcement encouraging other schools to establish recycling programs. The resulting PSA was created in conjunction with a local non-profit, The Lex Brodie Foundation and the City & County of Honolulu.

Indeed, the children of Kawaiaha‘o School are proof that from small things, big things come.